The Sabbath

The gospels abound with examples of Jesus repeatedly breaking the Sabbath hence provoking the religious elite of His day. Jesus’ extensive ministry on the Sabbath is parables showing that the Sabbath merely is a shadow pointing to Him. He is the Sabbath, and since the Sabbath is Him, that is, His own life, He can in freedom do whatever pleases Him in regards to it. And by so doing His actions testify to the goodness of the Father flying in the face of human traditions built on the letter and not the Spirit.

Jesus did many of His healing miracles on the Sabbath. They prefigure how He as the Sabbath would heal and restore mankind by His death and resurrection. Every healing success demonstrating the efficacy of the cross. By one of the many wonders of the Spirit the Sabbath comes alive in Christ so that we relax into a person and not a specific day.

Another pertinent question in this context is why the Jews performed circumcision on the Sabbath. This tradition plainly foreshadows that in Jesus the old man is cut off. Circumcision also denotes our nothingness and impotence, that is, without Him we can do nothing. It is at this juncture we face a two way temptation. “A temptation “up,” to see “this thing” as God and in God and at work for Divine purposes out of our inner oneness; or a temptation “down” in which our sight is locked into the temporal appearance as something in itself and “we” as “something in our selves” (separation) responding to this “thing” as if it is outside God, along with us outside God, too. Alone” (Fred Pruitt).

It was Sabbath when Jesus formed clay and put on the blind man’s eyes so that He became seeing. Clay in this context equals union because it was His saliva mixed with dust (we are made from dust) that constituted the mixture. The dust and the saliva become one. He in us and we in Him. Both components giving definition to the clay. It is impossible to know where dust begins and saliva leaves off. The amazing thing is that it is the dust we see, but in a new transformed version in oneness. The dust has become the Sabbath in which it rests from its own works.

It is worth noting that it is Jesus who molds and fashions the clay so that it becomes a unique expression of Christ. We are not responsible to form ourselves. We are safe in His loving hands to become exactly what we are meant to be according to His Divine purposes perfectly manifesting the Father in all things. The dust hasn’t lost anything when it is mixed with Christ. It doesn’t either appear as merely an improved version of itself. No, it has become something new, something never seen before.

“AT THAT particular time Jesus went through the fields of standing grain on the Sabbath; and His disciples were hungry, and they began to pick off the spikes of grain and to eat.” The plain truth is that Jesus is our food. He is the One who satisfies our hunger. He comes and calls us not in accordance with human traditions and assumptions, but most often contrary to reason and the natural mind. Those paths He takes us along have to contradict appearances and circumstances or else faith would be void and of no meaning.

“And he said unto them, The sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath” (Mark 2:27). It can’t be said much clearer than this. God lives wholly for his creation and gives himself unrestricted to it so that it in all things can be restored to its original paradisaical state. He is like the sun which rays of light and warmth can only bless and which gives itself wholly to those it shines upon.

It was Friday when Jesus took His last breath. It was Sunday when the Spirit breathed His life into Him again. But death reigned the entire Sabbath. The shadow died so that the substance by faith could enter into human consciousnesses.

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2 Responses to The Sabbath

  1. Sandra Christianson says:

    This is yet another confirmation to me that Jesus calls me to rest in him so he can do the work he wants to accomplish through me. I see him doing it daily. So wonderful to live this way!

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