Yes, I Am

The point of Christian faith is not in the efficacy or power of our own faith, but believing in the faith and faithfulness of Jesus himself, who stands in our place. We participate in Jesus’ own faith, fullness and knowledge. The incarnation, when properly understood, means that we have become partaker’s of the Triune life; the fellowship and camaraderie shared between the Father, Son and Spirit. As both wholly man and God, Jesus Christ ascended to be seated at the Father’s right hand. Our inclusion in His finished work connotes that we are where He is, more than that, we are included in the joyful existence of the Trinity. Before the foundation of the world the Father, Son and Spirit decided to share their quality of life with man in and through Jesus Christ.

In the incarnation we have been transferred from have not’s or “I am not” to “Yes, I am”. Our soul enemy was the first I am not. The simple reason is that he is not God. That old serpent thus has no creation power whatsoever, so the deception (Rev 12:7) revolves around convincing every man that he is a have not when the opposite is true. This lie is the sole reason for every tormenting emotion, feeling or thought which fruit is withdrawal and alienation from the very life we already are partakers of in Christ. In like manner as every man was included in the first Adam’s fall every man is included in the last Adam’s victory. This is not universalism. The question asked by the jailer in Acts is still valid: “What must I do to be saved?”

C Baxter Kruger writes: “Paul prays that we would come to comprehend and to know the love of Christ, that we “may be filled up to all the fulness of God.” In Colossians Paul says, “For in Him [Christ] all the fullness of Deity dwells in bodily form, and in Him you have been made full” (2:9-10). Clearly the fulness belongs to Jesus, and is then shared with us. Jesus himself tells us that he came to give us not simply peace, but his own peace (JN 14:27), and his own joy (15:11). And, of course, in his famous prayer it is abundantly clear that Jesus envisages the very love and glory of the Father and Son themselves dwelling in us personally (17:22-26).”

Owing to the fact that we have received everything which pertains to goodliness and life in Christ, that is, His fullness, it should be evident that He also shares His faith with us. We can fully rely on Christ’s faith. In the context of rest this understanding solidifies our rest. Perhaps needless to say, but in Christ we do not have to whip up a faith of our own, let alone, try to imitate His faith. This further implies that we can trust our faith since it is Christ’s own faith which wells up in us.

It is in this context we acknowledge that it is absolutely vital that we turn our back to the law. The law’s judgment is that we are have not’s. It declares everything we must become. Every instant this subtle sensation that we have to become something finds a crack in our armor our conclusion is that we are have not’s. “Yes, I am” or “I am” is the antidote to every idol about which the Bible gives severe cautions. Why? Because, when our identity is based on “I am not” we begin to erect our own identity. The joy, peace and fellowship shared with us through God’s grace evade us, and as a substitute, because we somehow know something is missing, we attempt to find joy and everything else pertaining to the Triune circle of life in externals.

The externals perpetuate this illusion that we are have not’s and they can never quench that thirst for genuine life which is in every man. This quest for joy, fulfillment and identity outside God creates an ever-increasing contradiction between our true selves in union with God, and the life we are living. Our attempt to create that what is already freely given us becomes our legend, our idol. Why does the Bible warn against this? It has nothing to do with God’s judgment. The warning is a token of love on account of when engrossed in this undertaking we create our own personal hell, the exact same hell from which God sent His son to save us. “For God so loved the world…….” Faith in Jesus Christ saves man and opens his eyes to the astonishing fact that he is included in the Triune circle of joy, love, peace and life. Faith doesn’t create this inclusion. Faith recognizes what is already accomplished.

The aforementioned contradiction is the cause for every bizarre ritual we find in the church or the world as a whole. We carve out, create and furnish rituals to keep the legend alive, the legend in which we have put our trust because the spontaneous genuine life which originates in God has eluded us.

To see ourselves accepted in Christ, embraced by our Father, included in the circle of life is the identity which declares: “Yes, I am!” It is an identity of hope and assurance, not of fear and anxiety. Freed from our self-centeredness we are quickened and refreshed, and instead of takers we become givers, instead of stifling life itself we become fountains of life. Paul says that when we understand that we are dead to the law, that is, that we are not “have not’s” we bear fruit for God.

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15 Responses to Yes, I Am

  1. Fred Pruitt says:

    Very very good. Very succinct — either, “No I am not,” or, “Yes I am.” Amen brother!

  2. Barbara Hughes says:

    To see ourselves accepted in Christ, embraced by our Father, included in the circle of life is the identity which declares: “Yes, I am!” It is an identity of hope and assurance, not of fear and anxiety. Freed from our self-centeredness we are quickened and refreshed, and instead of takers we become givers, instead of stifling life itself we become fountains of life. Paul says that when we understand that we are dead to the law, that is, that we are not “have not’s” we bear fruit for God.

    This whole article is flippin brill Ole, really! There has to be a way to present this to the world that is different than the past. THIS IS THE MOST OUTRAGEOUS GOOD NEWS YOU COULD EVER GIVE TO ANYBODY!!!!!!!
    Barbara :))))

  3. Hi Ole, I remember when it sounded odd and unlikely that his our faith is really his faith. How great it was to see finally that what we take, takes us, which includes his faith. You express this superbly, and I am most edified. Then too, you have original bite in the why “behind every bizarre ritual we find in the church or the world as a whole.” Also, it’s great how you put it that saying no to law brings a life both “quickened and refreshed,” which is for others. I remember in the 1970’s when “we’re for others” sounded like a mantra, but to see it is not a mantra but real. I think this article of yours is one of the best articles I have ever read on what you’re covering. It’s a classic I think.

    • Ole Henrik says:

      Dear Brian! While reading The Great Dance by C Baxter Kruger I was suddenly enveloped in a cloud of thoughts which more than encouraged and edified me; they were so insistent and pressing that I almost felt compelled to put them down in “ink” to the best of my abilities trusting the Spirit would do the rest. I am proud and humbled that you call it a classic. Thanks for your kindness!

  4. A. Brother says:

    Dear Ole:

    A first time reader and commenter, following a chain of blogs from Linda Bunting’s. Right on, brother. The “I am” is Christ in us. This truth eluded me for over 40 years of evangelical frustration. I was an angry, disillusioned believer in Christ, wondering where the love and power was, though my life was lived in the middle of “Christianity” and I was an “evangelical of evangelicals” to paraphrase our brother Paul.

    By the grace of God I lost all my worldly underpinnings. By His will and according to His love for me, He destroyed my crutches, taking away my livelihood, my career, my worldly wealth, my family’s esteem, my friends, and left my wife and I without anything to turn to but…the “I Am”–Christ.

    Now, He is restoring my life, but as His Life. He is constantly working in me, and I am constantly becoming Him. The cross came into my life, and this time, instead of wailing about in Gethsemane endlessly, as I had done before, I went with Him to Golgotha, and found that only in death to self, and death to the world, is Life in Christ. His resurrection power is daily working, and this ugly life has become His Life, full of Grace and Truth.

    I have been helped tremendously by the teachings of men like T. Austin-Sparks and others who declare fearlessly the original, unvarnished truth that Christ is all, and in all, and that we can never attain a “good Christian life”. We can only let Christ live in us, and become us, rejecting all religious notions and man-made traditions that stand in the way of that truth.

    My life is a work in progress, but one that He tells me to share with others, which I do daily in my own blog, The Narrow Gate. I am so happy that dozens from over 35 countries of the world read what He writes through me, and are encouraged to find the essential gospel which captivated and held the apostles and early disciples and enabled Christ to change the known world through them.

    Whenever I find brothers and sisters doing the same, as you are, I am so grateful to Christ Jesus, and give them encouragement.

    May you be blessed as you focus on Christ, and may your words and your work always exalt Him.

    In Christ,
    A. Brother
    (I write anonymously in my blog to stand against the current tide of “Christian Celebrity”)

  5. Ole Henrik says:

    Hi Brother! I am so grateful to discover that there are many of us who educated by the Spirit has found that Christ is our life. I am thrilled to hear that your blog connects with people from all across the world. Your comment had the desired effect: I was tremendously encouraged, and I enjoyed reading your testimony. Thanks for sharing it with us.

  6. Colin says:

    Brilliant as your per usual (yet without familiarity) brilliance, frother !!

    “This further implies that we can trust our faith since it is Christ’s own faith which wells up in us”

    Galatians 5:4 – Christ is made of no effect, if I continue in the false

  7. A. Brother says:

    Truly funny, guys. Briends and Frothers.
    Your Briend,
    A. Frother

  8. Reikken Hemel says:

    Sure is refreshing that once we get past our initial “Crisis of Identity” and come to embrace our true identity in Christ, how the burdens of life become lighter.

    As we transform from being self-centered to being Christ-centered, it seem that it becomes less about us, and more about Him: even our faith is not of our own; everything is from above. Self seems to become less and less important- we become expressions OF Christ….John the Baptist put it this way: “I must decrease that HE may increase.”

    Abounding Joy. Even amidst our suffering. Crazy, huh.🙂

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